2020 Spring/Summer Education Calendar

Union education means union power!

The power to defend out rights as workers, to protect the services we provide, and to build caring communities.

This year’s Spring/Summer Education Calendar covers a range of topics that will make our union stronger by equipping CUPE activists with new skills through course materials, and sharing with each other.

To attend any of these courses, contact your Local President to learn how.

Download the full 2020 Spring/Summer Education Calendar here

Courses include:

2020 CUPE Winter School (see Winter School Brochure)
➢ Gimli | February 20 – 23, 2020 | Lakeview Gimli Resort & Conference, 10 Centre Street

Advanced Steward Learning Series
• Challenging Racism in the Workplace
• Challenging Sexism in the Workplace
• Disability and Ableism in the Workplace
➢ Winnipeg | March 26 & 27, 2020 | Union Centre, Room 103-275 Broadway

• Duty of Fair Representation
• Representing Members in Front of Management
• What Stewards Need to Know about Arbitration
➢ Dauphin | May 14 & 15, 2020 | CUPE Dauphin Area Office, 121 1st Street S.W.
➢ Winnipeg | June 11 & 12, 2020 | Union Centre, Room 103-275 Broadway
BARG – At the Bargaining Table
➢ Winnipeg | May 21 & 22, 2020 | Union Centre, Room 103-275 Broadway
Conflict Resolution
   ➢ Winnipeg | May 7 & 8, 2020 | Union Centre, Room 103-275 Broadway
Register online at www.cupe.ca
Duty to Accommodate
➢ Winnipeg | March 5 & 6, 2020 | Union Centre, Room 103-275 Broadway
➢ Brandon | April 30 & May 1, 2020 | CUPE Brandon Area Office, 1911 Park Avenue
Financial Essentials and Financial Officers
➢ Winnipeg | April 30 & May 1, 2020 | Union Centre, Room 103-275 Broadway
➢ Brandon | May 7 & 8, 2020 | CUPE Brandon Area Office, 1911 Park Avenue
Hot Topics: Attendance Management
➢ Winnipeg | March 12, 2020 | Union Centre, Room 103-275 Broadway
➢ Brandon | March 19, 2020 | CUPE Brandon Area Office, 1911 Park Avenue
➢ Dauphin | April 23, 2020 | CUPE Dauphin Area Office, 121 1st Street S.W.
Introduction to Health and Safety
➢ Winnipeg | February 27 & 28, 2020 | Union Centre, Room 103-275 Broadway
➢ Brandon | March 12 & 13, 2020 | CUPE Brandon Area Office, 1911 Park Avenue
Introduction to Stewarding
➢ Brandon | February 27 & 28, 2020 | CUPE Brandon Area Office, 1911 Park Avenue
➢ Winnipeg | April 8 & 9, 2020 | Union Centre, Room 107-275 Broadway
Retirement Planning
➢ Brandon | April 8 & 9, 2020 | CUPE Brandon Area Office, 1911 Park Avenue
➢ Winnipeg | June 4 & 5, 2020 | Union Centre, Room 103-275 Broadway
Social Media
➢ Winnipeg | April 23 & 24, 2020 | Union Centre, Room 103-275 Broadway
➢ Brandon | June 4 & 5, 2020 | CUPE Brandon Area Office, 1911 Park Avenue

CUPE welcomes new members

CUPE welcomes new members in the WRHA, Shared Health, Southern Health, and the North

All health care workers are now members of their new union.

CUPE is pleased to welcome new and returning members to CUPE: in Southern Health-Santé Sud, the Northern Regional Health Authority, the Winnipeg Regional Health Authority and Shared Health.

CUPE now represents all Community and Facility Support workers in these health authorities.

We want to thank all unions involved in this process and are pleased to say all unions have been working together to ensure a smooth transition of new members.

The Commissioner responsible for implementing The Health Sector Bargaining Unit Review Act  has issued interim bargaining certificates, effective as of December 8th (rural RHAs) and December 13th (WRHA and Shared Health), certifying CUPE as your union. He will eventually issue permanent certificates, and the interim ones are valid until that time.

With 36,000 members in Manitoba and 700,000 across the country, CUPE is now the largest union in Manitoba and Canada. We want to live up to the trust you have placed in CUPE.

Please watch for local stewards and representatives in your workplace in the new year, for more health care news, and for information about the bargaining process.

CUPE is also working hard to get to the bargaining table.  We want to negotiate a new collective agreement for you.

What happens now?

CUPE now represents you if you are a Facility Support or Community Support worker employed in these health authorities:

– Northern Regional Health Authority
– Southern Health–Santé Sud
– Winnipeg Regional Health Authority (including Churchill)
– Shared Health

  • CUPE now represents you for any existing grievances or processes, even if they were filed by another union.
  • You will now pay dues to CUPE.
  • Your old contract remains your contract until bargaining concludes (even after you join CUPE).
  • Once a new CUPE agreement is bargained and ratified by the members, this new agreement will cover you.

How can I find out more about CUPE?

Visit:                www.cupe.ca, and cupe.mb.ca

Facebook:       @CUPE SCFP, and @CUPE Manitoba
Twitter:          
@CUPENat, and @CUPEMB

Note to new CUPE members:
CUPE’s structure may be different from other unions.

Here are the basics:

CUPE is a member-driven union, where members are involved directly in decision-making. We believe you know what’s best for your workplace. That’s why your CUPE local is so important.

Shop Stewards, site Vice-Presidents, and your Executive are elected by you, the members, and can be contacted to help with your day-to day needs.

Shop Stewards, along with Union Support Officers, and professional National Servicing Representatives are there to help you when you need union representation at work.

National Servicing Representatives and Specialists (like Legal, Research, Human Rights, Union Development, Safety and Health, Pensions, and Communications) are all available to your CUPE local to help take on arbitrations, human rights issues, and fights against privatization and contracting out.

CUPE National and CUPE Manitoba are also here to support you, and your unique workplace needs.

CUPE’s education department provides training to local Shop Stewards and activists to make sure you have representatives right in your workplace who are equipped with the knowledge and experience to seek information and speak up in meetings with management.

If you were an activist, Shop Steward, or Executive Member in your previous union, please don’t hesitate to contact us about getting involved with CUPE.

When can bargaining begin?

A bargaining unit certificate is the legal document that explains which union represents each group of workers. Now that we have bargaining unit certificates, we can start the bargaining process.

CUPE’s contracts are the best in health care! CUPE ensures that every member can make suggestions on how to improve their collective agreement.

To prepare for bargaining:

  • CUPE is working on Essential Services Agreements. These agreements tell us how many staff must work in each facility in the event of job action like a strike or lock out. By law, we cannot bargain until Essential Services Agreements are done.
  • Your CUPE bargaining committee will do a bargaining survey electronically and will also distribute paper copies to members who request this.
  • The bargaining committee will compile the results of the surveys and prepare the proposal package.

Then bargaining can begin, using the designated receiving agreement as a base.

What can I do?

  • Please make sure we have your most recent contact information, including cell phone number and personal email. We do not use work contact information to reach you for union business.
  • Do not hesitate to contact CUPE if you have any questions or concerns.

Contact your CUPE Local:

– WRHA & Shared Health: CUPE 204
– President Debbie Boissonneault at 204-775-2873, cupe204.ca@gmail.com, www.cupe204.ca, or Facebook @cupe204

– Southern Health-Santé Sud: CUPE 4270
– President Darrin Cook at drcook@xplornet.com

– Northern Regional Health Authority: CUPE 8600
– President Christine Lussier at cblussier@outlook.com

Shannon McAteer, CUPE Health Care Coordinator, may be reached at:

Phone:       204-942-0343
Email:        healthcare@cupe.ca

Indigenous Women’s Healing Centre staff ratify first Collective Agreement

Contract language includes paid days off for traditional Indigenous ceremony

Employees at the Indigenous Women’s Healing Centre in Winnipeg have ratified their first collective agreement with CUPE Local 2348.

“We are excited that this group now has the protection of a CUPE Collective Agreement” says Allen Bleich, CUPE National Servicing Representative.

“What’s more, this Collective Agreement has important contract language that recognizes traditional Indigenous ceremonies as a workplace right for staff”.

The new language, Article 21.13 Ceremonial Leave, allows “employees wishing to take part in traditional Indigenous ceremony(s) such as a Sundance or healing ceremony up to four (4) paid working days leave per calendar year, provided that such leave is authorized by the Employer in advance”.

The four days leave for Indigenous ceremony were a workplace policy prior to negotiating the new Collective Agreement, however moving the language from policy to being enshrined in the legal contract is an important step to ensuring these days cannot be taken away should management ever change.

“We are proud that our CUPE negotiating team bargained this important language into our contract,” says Joan Hay, Shop Steward for CUPE 2348 at the Indigenous Women’s Healing Centre.

“Reconciliation includes ensuring that our workplaces recognize Indigenous culture and tradition, and I am proud to be part of a member-driven union where we can prioritize and include Indigenous perspectives and traditions into our bargaining”.

The new contract also recognizes June 21, National Indigenous Peoples’ Day, and September 30, National Day for Truth and Reconciliation Day as paid holidays for staff.

Including Indigenous traditions into Collective Agreements is not uncommon in CUPE, with language ranging from the inclusion of Indigenous Elders in the grievance and mediation process, to recognizing Indigenous bereavement practices.

The Indigenous Women’s Healing Centre works to support and strengthen Indigenous women and others on their journey of healing and recovery from family violence, addictions, intergenerational issues, and institutionalization.

CUPE represents approximately 40 staff who work as Case Managers, Counselors, Residential Support Workers, Maintenance, Practical Skills Workers, Healing plan Coordinators, Facilitators, Mentors, and Cultural Support Workers.

CUPE as an organization continues to learn, adapt, and grow in the journey towards true reconciliation. Contract language is one step, however we recognize that addressing the long-term impacts of colonization takes meaningful partnerships and continued action.

Manitoba Throne Speech threatens public education, child care, and continues to hurt front-line health care – CUPE

The Manitoba Throne Speech offers little reassurance that the provincial government will support public education and child care, says the Canadian Union of Public Employees.

“With the elimination of the education property tax, we are concerned that the government will resort to school cuts, especially under the auspices of the K-12 review,” said Abe Araya, President of Manitoba. “Where is the government going to come up with funding for our children’s education?”

The Throne Speech also introduces the government’s plans to increase private child care spaces in the province, including for capital investments in private child care facilities.

“The government should be focused on increasing public, affordable child care across Manitoba, rather than subsidizing private facilities that could end up costing families more,” said Araya. “Childcare advocates have been calling for fully funded public child care in the province, and this government is going the opposite direction”.

CUPE Manitoba President Abe Araya, and CUPE 204 President Debbie Boissonneault at the Manitoba Throne Speech

The government’s sweeping changes to the health care system continues to impact front-line health care support staff.

“As the government and health authorities continue to implement their restructuring of health care, support workers remain understaffed and under-valued,” said Debbie Boissonneault, President of CUPE Local 204 representing Community and Facility Support staff in the WRHA and Shared Health.

“We need investments in support staff positions, as well as a commitment from the province that they will not be privatizing or contracting out any health care services”.

The Canadian Union of Public Employees is Canada’s largest union representing more than 700,000 members. In Manitoba, CUPE is the province’s largest union, representing approximately 36,000 members working in health care facilities, personal care homes, school divisions, municipal services, social services, child care centres, public utilities, libraries and family emergency services.

 

Abe Araya Elected as President of CUPE Manitoba

BRANDON – Delegates at the 2019 CUPE Manitoba Convention in Brandon elected Abe Araya as President of the province’s largest union. Abe Araya comes from CUPE Local 110, representing custodians, maintenance, and painters at the Winnipeg School Division.

“Our union is focused on fighting back against cuts to health care, education, social services, and privatization,” said Araya. “Despite Brian Pallister’s attempts to divide working people, we will be uniting workers from across Manitoba to put a stop to Pallister’s austerity agenda.”

Delegates at convention voted in support resolutions, ranging from health and safety in the workplace, anti-oppression training for activists, pushing back against privatization, fighting against health care and education cuts, and supporting the Green New Deal.

“CUPE is an incredibly diverse union,” said Araya. “With the strength of Manitoba’s largest union, we will be on the front line defending public health care and education, public Hydro, and fighting for properly funded childcare and social services for all Manitobans.”

CUPE’s annual convention featured guest speakers, including NDP leader Wab Kinew, NDP Critic for Infrastructure and Municipal Affairs Matt Wiebe, NDP Member of Parliament for Winnipeg Centre Leah Gazan, Winnipeg School Division Trustee Yijie Chen, and Manitoba Health Coalition Director Breanne Goertzen.

CUPE National President Mark Hancock and CUPE National Secretary-Treasurer Charles Fleury spoke to delegates, committing the full strength of CUPE’s 700,000 members to fight against cuts and privatization.

Manitoba Federation of Labour President Kevin Rebeck provided updates on labour’s united front against Bill 28 (The Public Services Sustainability Act) and committed to fight against the Pallister government’s unconstitutional wage freeze.

Two hundred people rallied outside Brandon City Hall with CUPE Local 69 on Wednesday evening, voicing concern over the contracting out of work at the Wheat City Golf Course.

Gord Delbridge, President of CUPE Local 500 served as interim CUPE Manitoba President throughout 2019. Delbridge continues to serve as Vice-President of CUPE Manitoba. Barb Gribben of CUPE Local 737 was this year’s recipient of the prestigious Jack Rodie Award, recognizing dedication and activism in the union.

“Our union is stronger, and more united than ever,” said Araya. “Manitobans can count on CUPE to defend good jobs, and fight for our public services.”

The Canadian Union of Public Employees is Canada’s largest union representing more than 700,000 members.  In Manitoba, CUPE represents over 36,000 members working in health care facilities, personal care homes, school divisions, municipal services, social services, childcare centres, public utilities, libraries and family emergency services.

2020 Manitoba Winter School, February 20 -23, 2020

Union education means union power!
The power to defend out rights as workers, to protect the services we provide, and to build caring communities.

This year’s CUPE Winter School covers a range of topics that will make our union stronger by equipping CUPE activists with new skills through course materials, and sharing with each other.

To attend CUPE Winter School, contact your Local President to learn how.

Download the full 2020 CUPE Winter School brochure here.

Courses include:

Advanced Health and Safety Learning Series

  • Understanding Mental Injuries at Work
  • Ergonomics
  • Law and Order
  • Recommendations and Notetaking
  • Violence Prevention

Bargaining

  • How Bargaining Works
  • Analyzing your Collective Agreement
  • At the Bargaining Table

Advanced Steward Learning Series

  • Duty of Fair Representation
  • Representing Members in Front of Management
  • Taking on Privatization
  • Conflict Skills for Stewards
  • Psychologically Safe Workplaces

Understanding Equity

  • Women Breaking Barriers
  • Challenging Sexism in the Workplace
  • Women Speaking UpCUPE Activists are encouraged to contact their Local Presidents to learn more about how to be sent to Winter School from your Local.

 

Health Care Support Workers’ Recognition Week: October 21-25, 2019

This week, CUPE is celebrating the work of its thousands of members in health care support roles across the Manitoba.

The Manitoba Government officially proclaimed the week of October 21 to 25, 2019 as Health Care Support Workers’ Recognition Week. The government failed to proclaim the week in 2018, but because of CUPE’s request it has once again been recognized.

“Health care support workers are the pillars of our health care system,” stated Debbie Boissonneault President of CUPE 204, representing facility and community support workers in the WRHA and Shared Health. “We work hard every day to keep our health care system working, but these days we’ve been feeling left behind.”

CUPE been calling on the government to get to the bargaining table and negotiate a fair contract for health care support workers. But with the government’s unconstitutional wage freeze legislation, the recent forced health care representation votes, and Pallister’s overhaul of the health care system, support workers are under more pressure than ever before.

“Health care support workers are often unrecognized in their day-to-day work ,” said Darrin Cook, President of CUPE 4270, representing facility and community support workers in Southern Health – Sante Sud. “We should all take the time this week to thank the health care support workers in every community who care for our health”.

“From Nunavut to the US border, Manitoba’s health care support workers deserve recognition and respect,” said Christine Lussier, President of CUPE 8600, representing facility and community support workers in the Northern Regional Health Authority. “It has been difficult times for staff, but health care support workers in the NRHA have been critical in keeping our community healthy”.

“Despite working short-staffed, health care support workers in Manitoba have been doing everything possible to care for the community”, said Margaret Schroeder, President of CUPE 5362, representing staff at CancerCare Manitoba. “We call on the government to recognize our work by providing enough resources for us to do it effectively”.

CUPE locals across Manitoba are holding or participating in events to express appreciation for health care support workers. CUPE is also calling on the government to immediately meet with representatives of CUPE to discuss the impact of the province’s health care overhaul on front line staff.

See the full proclamation.

Winnipeg’s Executive Policy Committee takes next step towards Living Wage Policy

Following a significant campaign by CUPE 500, the City of Winnipeg took one step closer to implementing a Living Wage Policy for city workers and contractors delivering city services.

CUPE Local 500 presented to Winnipeg’s Executive Policy Committee (EPC) on September 17th and October 8th, encouraging members of EPC to support a Living Wage Policy for Winnipeg’s staff and contractors hired by the city to deliver services.

Following a report from City Administration that highlighted other jurisdictions which already have Living Wage policies, EPC voted to prepare an implementation plan for a similar policy for Winnipeg.

“We are calling for a Living Wage Policy not only for our own members, but for the private contractors and subcontractors that do work for our city”, says Gord Delbridge, President of CUPE Local 500.

“We are also calling for a Living Wage Policy to help lift marginalized Winnipeg citizens, including young people, women, Indigenous, and racialized workers out of poverty while they are doing work for our community”.

Currently 13% of civic staff and contractors earn less than $15 per hour, many of whom are women, young, Indigenous, or racialized workers.

CUPE campaigned during the 2018 Winnipeg municipal election calling on election candidates to support a Living Wage Policy.

CUPE 500 commissioned a poll during the election which found 81% of Winnipeggers support a Living Wage Policy.

CUPE 500 has also been pushing to include non-unionized contractors and subcontractors in the Living Wage Policy, a move Delbridge hopes will lift all those working on projects for the City of Winnipeg out of poverty-level wages.

While the Motion passed 6-1 to conduct a cost review of implementing a Living Wage Policy for the City of Winnipeg, the cost of doing nothing means that some city staff and many private contractors working for the city will continue to be at risk of living in poverty.

“A Living Wage Policy for Winnipeg needs to happen now. We believe that nobody should work at poverty-level wages, and for these workers, every day matters.”

Changes to Manitoba’s Public Services Sustainability Act continue to undermine fair collective bargaining – CUPE

On October 7th the Pallister government introduced Bill 2, an amendment to the current Public Services Sustainability Act, commonly known as the “wage freeze” Bill.

The government continues to limit wage increases through legislation, as well as other monetary items that would otherwise be negotiated through free collective bargaining.

“This legislation continues to interfere in free collective bargaining, by legislating wage limits, rather than allowing employers and workers to negotiate”, says Gord Delbridge, President of CUPE Manitoba, the province’s largest union and partner in the multi-union group currently challenging the government in court.

“Why is this government so afraid of getting to the bargaining table and negotiating a fair deal?”

Amendments to the act gives government more authority to make decisions behind the closed door of the Cabinet table, rather than through meaningfully at the bargaining table.

“Rather than coming to the table and participating in traditional negotiations, which have seen thousands of successful contracts bargained between employers and unions in Manitoba over numerous governments, the Pallister government continues to come up with new confusing schemes”, said Delbridge.

“This new act doesn’t make bargaining easier for anyone, and continues to be unfair and unconstitutional”.

Link to full amendment.

Notes:

  • The Public Services Sustainability Act has not yet been enacted.
  • Amendments to the act include potentially shortening the “sustainability period”, but also create numerous limitations and barriers for that to happen.
  • The Act could also undermine current awards determined by arbitration, as well as provides authority to the Minister to interfere with tentative agreements between employers and unions.
  • The amendments to this act do not address union concerns about free and democratic collective bargaining.
  • Government says that this will make collective bargaining more flexible – but in reality, it provides further restrictions and attempts to control the outcome.

CUPE celebrates School Support Staff Recognition Week, Sept 23 – 27, 2019

The Province of Manitoba has declared the week of September 23 – 27, 2019 as School Support Staff Recognition Week.

Because of CUPE, the Manitoba government has recognized the hard work of school support staff since 2013, and has set aside this important week to acknowledge the value of school support staff to our education system.

“School support staff in Manitoba help keep our schools safe and clean, they get our kids to school safely, keep our schools running, and they help our children learn, grow, and succeed,” says Gord Delbridge, President of CUPE Manitoba.

“Recognizing school support staff goes beyond a proclaimed recognition week – we need to continue to support them in fighting for fair wages, pension & benefits, and workplace health and safety”.

Minister of Education Kelvin Goertzen wrote to CUPE, thanking school support staff and our union for encouraging Manitobans to recognize and appreciate the work of school support staff in Manitoba.

“School Support Staff Recognition Week in Manitoba will provide educators, parents and community members with many opportunities to thank school support staff for the valuable role they play in schools, and in the functioning of Manitoba’s education system” wrote Goertzen.

CUPE School Division Sector is running a this week, encouraging the public to thank school support workers in Manitoba.

See the full proclamations below: